Club Venue: Ducklington Village Hall, OX29 7UX

 

Oxfordshire

Chess Association

 

 

 

Witney Chess Club is

not responsible for

the content of external internet sites.

 

 

 

Chess congress gives Witney club chance to shine

Wednesday 21st August 2013

 

 

Witney Chess Club’s Marcus Harvey

is the top-rated under-18 in the country.

 

THE organisers of Witney’s first weekend chess congress in October hope it will further help to put the town on the chess map and boost local businesses.

 

The event will be staged at Cokethorpe School, near Ducklington, on Saturday, October 19, and Sunday, October 20. Entries are already starting to come in.

 

 
   

Witney Chess Club’s own young star Marcus Harvey, the top under-18 player in the UK, has confirmed his appearance, and the club’s top-rated player, Grandmaster Peter Wells, is also hoping to enter.

 

THE organisers of Witney’s first weekend chess congress in October hope it will further help to put the town on the chess map and boost local businesses.

 

The event will be staged at Cokethorpe School, near Ducklington, on Saturday, October 19, and Sunday, October 20. Entries are already starting to come in.

 

More here | Enter the Witney Congress | Oxford Times article |

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26.4.13 - Matt Rose writes about Witney's league and cup double in the Oxford Times.

Oxfordshire soundly beat Bucks

By Matt Rose | Thursday 1st November 2012

 

Oxfordshire soundly beat neighbours Buckinghamshire by 14-6 when the two counties met in a Chiltern League open section match last weekend.

 

The consensus after the match was that the contest on board 2 was the pick of the games - despite the fact that it ended - perhaps prematurely - in a draw. The game quickly became very exciting with neither side flinching from the challenge.

 
   

 

White: Mike Truran (Oxfordshire) Black: Philip Bonafont (Buckinghamshire)

 

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 Well OK, the opening is called the Queen’s Gambit - so Philip accepts the pawn. Still, declining the gambit with 2...e6 or 2...c6 are much more popular alternatives.

 

3.e4 e5 4.Nf3 It’s almost needless to say that 4.dxe5 Qxd1+ 5.Kxd1 Nc6 6.f4 Bg4+ offers White very little.

 

4...exd4 5.Bxc4 Nc6 6.0–0 Be6 7.Bb5 Bc5 8.Nbd2 To me, the dynamic 8.b4!? looks tempting. Then, if 8...Bb6, White can continue in true gambit style with 9.a4 a5 10.bxa5 Rxa5 11.Nbd2 obtaining good compensation.

 

8...Nge7 9.Nb3 Most top players seem to play 9.Ng5 here - but even then, Black seems fine after 9...Qd7 10.Nxe6 Qxe6 11.Nb3 Qd6 12.Bf4! Qxf4 13.Nxc5 0–0!

 

9...Bxb3 10.Qxb3 0–0 11.Bg5!? h6 12.Bh4 Bb6 13.Rac1 a6 14.Bxc6 bxc6 15.Rxc6!? A brave move that in effect offers a piece sacrifices to open up the black king.

 

15...g5!? Equally bravely, Philip accepts the challenge.

 

16.Rxh6 gxh4 17.Ng5!? This is where it gets hard. There were several tempting continuations for White and it’s not clear which was best. 17.Nxh4 would be met as in the game by 17...d3 and 17.Rxh4 by 17…Ng6 (here 17...d3 is no longer good because White has 18.Rg4+ Kh8 19.Ne5 with a very dangerous attack.) 18.Rg4 Kh7 19.Ne5. It’s possible that 17.Rd1 may be best, bringing another piece into the attack and stopping the annoying d3 idea.

 

17...d3! Essential and multi-purpose - but primarily to stop the white queen swinging across on the third rank.

 

18.Qd1 Qd4?! Better was 18...Ng6! to answer 19.Qh5 with 19...Qf6! defending though giving back an exchange to 20.Nh7.

 

19.Qh5 Threatening 20.Rg6+ and 21.Qh7 mate. 19...Qg7 20.Rh7 Qf6 21.e5! Qxe5 22.Rxf7 Qh8! It looks highly unlikely that this defence will hold - but it does!

 

23.Rh7 Qe5 24.Rf7 Qh8 25.Qxh8+ Mike goes for the win rather than acquiesce to the draw by repetition.

 

25...Kxh8 26.Rxe7 Kg8? Much better was 26...Rae8! when, of course, 27.Rd7? is met by 27...Rxf2!

 

27.Rd7 Rad8 28.Rxd8 Rxd8 29.Rd1 c5? An illogical move after which Mike is close to winning; activating the rook with 29...Re8 was clearly superior.

 

30.b3! d2?! 31.Nf3 Ba5 32.Kf1 h3!? 33.gxh3 Kg7 34.Ke2 Re8+ 35.Kf1 Anticipating a repetition and short of time, the players agreed a draw here. This is understandable after such a tough fight; but in fact Mike might have played on with 35.Kd3! and then after 35...Re1 36.Kc2 Re2 37.Nxd2 Rxf2 38.Kd3 Rxh2 39.Nc4 Bc7 40.Ke4 White has good winning chances.

 

Original article here.

 

 

 

Thursday 4th October 2012

 

Witney's accolade is well deserved

 

The English Chess Federations’ new Club of the Year is Witney Chess Club.

 

It’s a well-deserved honour to a club that has undergone a renaissance in recent years and swept the board for Oxfordshire top honours last season — winning both the 1st division title and the Frank Wood Shield cup competition.

 

Witney meet from 7.30pm on Mondays and have a terrific venue: Ducklington Village Hall.

 

New members are of course especially welcome and the club has a thriving junior section. Oxfordshire’s most promising junior, Marcus Harvey, 16, is set to join the club and take on some coaching duties. Full article here.

 

 

 

Checkmate for group named top club in UK

1:00pm Saturday 15th September 2012

 

 

Witney Chess Club player Joost Hoppe, in red, makes his move

 

A WITNEY chess group that was on the brink of collapse seven ago has now been named the top club in the UK.

 

Witney Chess Club had just a handful of members and struggled to enter competitions but now has a pool of 40 players, many of them youngsters.

 

They have been named by the English Chess Foundation, the body that oversees chess in the UK, as the top club in the country.

 

The award follows the success of their young players, who – after teaming up with Cumnor Chess Club – won the junior national league last year.

 

Mike Truran, the club treasurer, said: “We are absolutely delighted. “It gives confirmation that all the hard work we have been trying to put in place is worth it and is recognised by the English chess scene.”

 

Full story with additional pictures ...

 

 

 

Checkmate for group named top club in UK

Saturday, 15 September 2012

 

 

Jake Holton

 

A WITNEY chess group that was on the brink of collapse seven ago has now been named the top club in the UK.

 

 

Mike Truran

Witney Chess Club had just a handful of members and struggled to enter competitions but now has a pool of 40 players, many of them youngsters.

 

They have been named by the English Chess Foundation, the body that oversees chess in the UK, as the top club in the country.

 

The award follows the success of their young players, who – after teaming up with Cumnor Chess Club – won the junior national league last year.

 

Mike Truran, the club treasurer, said: “We are absolutely delighted. “It gives confirmation that all the hard work we have been trying to put in place is worth it and is recognised by the English chess scene.”

 

More here ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© SC

 

© 2015 Witney Chess Club